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Gatifloxacin Medication Information - Home Remedies for Diaper Rash

This page contains links to eMedTV Kids Articles containing information on subjects from Gatifloxacin Medication Information to Home Remedies for Diaper Rash. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Gatifloxacin Medication Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides some basic information on gatifloxacin, a medication used to treat pink eye. It includes general dosing guidelines, what to tell the doctor prescribing it, and links to more details on this product.
  • Gatifloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    This eMedTV article presents a brief overview of the ophthalmic product gatifloxacin, a solution for pink eye. This segment provides some basic dosing information and includes a link to more detailed information on this eye drop.
  • Gatifloxacin Overdose
    Because there are no reported cases of gatifloxacin overdoses, the effects are largely unknown. This eMedTV page describes what might happen if someone uses too much of this medicine, either orally or in the eye, as well as the likely treatment options.
  • Gatifloxacin Side Effects
    In clinical studies, the most common gatifloxacin side effects were eye irritation and eye pain. This eMedTV article lists more common reactions to this antibiotic eye drop, as well as potentially serious side effects that require prompt medical care.
  • Gatifloxcin
    This page from the eMedTV library provides a brief look at gatifloxacin, which is used to treat bacterial conjunctivitis. It addresses general dosing guidelines and important treatment precautions. Gatifloxcin is a common misspelling of gatifloxacin.
  • Gatifloxicin
    Pink eye is a common eye infection; however, it can usually be treated with gatifloxacin. This eMedTV page describes this drug in some detail, including side effects to be aware of during treatment. Gatifloxicin is a common misspelling of gatifloxacin.
  • Generic ActHIB
    Because it is a biologic medication, generic versions of ActHIB are currently unavailable. This eMedTV resource describes the laws and regulations surrounding biopharmaceuticals that prevent generic formulas from being manufactured.
  • Generic Adacel
    Currently, generic Adacel products are not allowed to be made in the United States. This page from the eMedTV library explains why generic versions of the vaccine cannot be made at this time and whether these laws are likely to change in the future.
  • Generic Atrovent Nasal Spray
    Generic Atrovent nasal spray is sold under the name ipratropium bromide nasal spray. This portion of the eMedTV archives describes the strengths that are available for treating a runny nose and also lists the companies that manufacture the medication.
  • Generic Boostrix
    Generic "biologic" drugs, including generic Boostrix, are not allowed to be manufactured. This eMedTV page explains why biologics cannot be made into generics and discusses how current legislation may change these rules to allow for generic versions.
  • Generic Cipro Ear Drop
    At this time, no generic versions of ciprofloxacin ear drops (Cetraxal) are available. This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at why this is the case and provides a link to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Generic Comvax
    Comvax (Hib vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine) is not available in generic form. This eMedTV article explains why there is currently no generic Comvax available and whether a generic version is likely to appear in the future.
  • Generic Daptacel
    There are currently no generic versions of Daptacel available for sale. This article from the eMedTV archives explains why Daptacel and other "biologics" are not available in generic form and whether this will change in the near future.
  • Generic Gatifloxacin
    As you'll see in this eMedTV selection, one version of gatifloxacin is available in generic form. This article takes a look at the effectiveness and availability of this product and explains when the other form of gatifloxacin may go generic.
  • Generic Hiberix
    There are currently no generic versions of Hiberix available on the market. This eMedTV page offers information on why Hiberix and other vaccines are not allowed to be manufactured in generic form and explains whether this will change in the future.
  • Generic Increlex
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Increlex (mecasermin) is not available as a generic medication at this time. This resource explains why a generic Increlex product is unavailable and discusses when a generic version might be made.
  • Generic Infanrix
    There are no generic versions of Infanrix available at this time. This eMedTV resource offers information on why "biologics" such as Infanrix are not available in generic form and explains whether these products will be available in the future.
  • Generic IPOL
    At this time, generic IPOL is not available, as is common with vaccines. This eMedTV page offers information on why vaccines and other "biologics" are not allowed to be made in generic form and explains whether this may change in the future.
  • Generic Kinrix
    There are currently no generic versions of Kinrix. As this segment of the eMedTV library explains, generic "biologics" such as Kinrix are not allowed to be made. However, these laws are changing, and generic biologics may be available in the future.
  • Generic Lupron
    This article from the eMedTV Web site explains that generic Lupron (leuprolide) is available in one form and strength. This page also discusses why only generic versions of this drug are available and whether they are equivalent to brand-name Lupron.
  • Generic Menactra
    At this time, there is no generic Menactra (meningococcal vaccine). However, as this part of the eMedTV library explains, it is possible that the rules and laws preventing generic versions could change in the not-too-distant future.
  • Generic MenHibrix
    As a "biologic" drug, MenHibrix is not available in generic form due to certain laws and regulations. This eMedTV article explains why generic biologics are not allowed at this time and discusses whether a generic MenHibrix might become available.
  • Generic Name of Lupron
    As this eMedTV article explains, the generic name of Lupron is Leuprolide injection. This page takes a brief look at this generic drug, including what it's used for and whether it's as good as the brand-name drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Generic Natroba
    At this time, Natroba (spinosad) is not available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV Web site explores when a generic version could become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Pediarix
    At this time, Pediarix is not available in generic form. This eMedTV page explains why Pediarix and other "biologic" medications are not available in generic form and offers information on whether these products will be available in the near future.
  • Generic PedvaxHIB
    At this time, specific laws and regulations prevent generic PedvaxHIB from being manufactured. This page from the eMedTV library explains these rules and regulations, but adds that generic versions of biologics such as PedvaxHIB may be available soon.
  • Generic Pentacel
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Pentacel licensed for sale. This segment from the eMedTV Web site provides information on why Pentacel is not available in generic form and explains whether this is expected to change in the future.
  • Generic Prevnar 13
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, there are no generic versions of Prevnar 13 (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) available at this time. This article explains why this is so and explores the rules surrounding "biologic" drugs.
  • Generic ProQuad
    ProQuad (MMRV), like other "biologic" medications, is not allowed to be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV page describes the rules and laws that govern biologic medications and explains the only way that generic ProQuad products could be made.
  • Generic Quixin
    You can buy a generic version of Quixin eye drops. This article from the eMedTV archives explains how the FDA has determined that generic Quixin is as good as the brand-name medicine. A list of the manufacturers of the generic drug is also provided.
  • Generic Rotarix
    As this segment from the eMedTV Web site explains, generic versions of Rotarix are not allowed to be manufactured at this time. This article offers information on why this is and explains when (and if) generic forms of the vaccine could become available.
  • Generic Sklice
    There are no generic Sklice (ivermectin lotion) products available at this time. This eMedTV segment examines when a generic product may become available. It also explains how ivermectin is the active ingredient in Sklice, not a generic version of it.
  • Generic Synagis
    As this eMedTV page explains, Synagis (palivizumab) is a "biologic" drug, so it is not allowed to be made in generic form at this time. This page discusses how certain laws prevent a generic Synagis from being made and when a version might be available.
  • Generic Tessalon
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Tessalon (benzonatate) is made by a number of companies, including Major Pharmaceuticals. This article also lists the available strengths of the generics and explains how they compare to brand-name Tessalon.
  • Generic Ulesfia
    No generic Ulesfia (benzyl alcohol lotion) products are currently available. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic product may become available and explains that benzyl alcohol is the active ingredient in Ulesfia -- not a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Vaqta
    Because Vaqta is a "biologic" drug, companies are not allowed to make a generic version. This eMedTV Web selection explains why generic biologics are not allowed at this time and discusses whether a generic Vaqta might become available at some point.
  • Generic Vigamox
    At this time, generic Vigamox (moxifloxacin eye drops) is unavailable. This section of the eMedTV library talks about the patent protecting the brand-name version of the drug and discusses when a generic version could become available.
  • Generic Vusion
    Vusion ointment is currently not available in generic form. This eMedTV page contains information on why no generic versions are being made and explains how Vusion is different from nonprescription ointments.
  • Grab Bag
    When all the games are played and all the snacks are eaten, panic may begin to set in. Now what? One thing to do before you travel is make a quick stop by the dollar store. Picking up a few fun toys, coloring books, or various activities for a small amount of money can go a long way while you are traveling. Some parents like to wrap these items up individually and put them in a grab bag. You can even set mile markers -- every hour a child has behaved, he or she can pick a surprise out of the grab bag!
  • Guide To Feeding Infants
    Infant feeding guidelines cover a baby's nutritional needs from birth to one year of age. This eMedTV article provides a general guide for feeding infants, including information on when to start certain foods.
  • Hair Loss After Pregnancy
    Telogen effluvium is a medical condition that causes hair loss after pregnancy. This page of the eMedTV site discusses this condition in more detail, including how frequently it affects women after pregnancy and how you can help minimize this hair loss.
  • Head Lice
    Even though head lice are very common, they are easily treated, and the lice do not spread disease. This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview on head lice, including information on the insect's life cycle, transmission methods, and treatment.
  • Headlice
    Head lice are small insects that infest the hair and scalp. This eMedTV Web page briefly explains the symptoms of an infestation and includes a link to more detailed information. Headlice is a common misspelling of head lice.
  • Help Your Baby Talk
    In general, most babies can learn their native language in less than two years. This eMedTV resource further discusses language learning development in babies, including information on ways to help your baby talk (such as singing, reading, and talking).
  • Here We Go Again...
    Call it amnesia, stupidity, or just Mother Nature's way of continuing the species. Sometime sooner or later, you'll probably decide you want another baby. The sleepless nights, endless diaper changes, and hours of crying for no reason are all just a distant memory. All you can remember are cute little outfits, tiny baby toes, and sweet baby snuggles. These feelings may come as a complete surprise, especially to parents who didn't think they wanted more children. Try to reconcile your wistful baby memories with the actual realities of having young children, though, before deciding you want to start all over again.
  • Hiberix
    Hiberix is a childhood vaccine used to prevent a type of bacteria that can cause life-threatening diseases. This eMedTV article further explores the benefits of the product, explains how and when to get vaccinated, and describes how the vaccine works.
  • Hiberix Dosage
    The standard dosage for Hiberix is one injection given between 15 months and four years of age. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on how dosing works for the booster vaccine and explains why it may not be needed in some children.
  • Hiberix Drug Interactions
    Cyclosporine, sirolimus, warfarin, and various other medicines may cause drug interactions with Hiberix. This eMedTV page provides a list of other drugs that may interfere with Hiberix and describes the potential effects of these drug interactions.
  • Hiberix Side Effects
    Common side effects with Hiberix include injection site reactions, diarrhea, and drowsiness. This eMedTV segment lists other common side effects of this vaccine and also describes rare but potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Hiberix Uses
    Hiberix provides protection against invasive diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This eMedTV resource explains how the vaccine works, further describes its benefits, and discusses possible off-label uses for Hiberix.
  • Hiberix Vaccine Information
    Hiberix protects against a certain type of bacteria that can cause potentially life-threatening diseases. This eMedTV resource offers helpful information about the childhood vaccine Hiberix and includes a link to more details.
  • Hiberix Warnings and Precautions
    Hiberix may not be as effective for people with immune-suppressing conditions. This eMedTV article lists other warnings and precautions with Hiberix and explains what side effects or complications may occur with this particular vaccine.
  • Hide It
    No, we aren't talking about hiding a pill in a piece of cheese. While such tricks may fool your pet, your child is much too sophisticated for such games. What we're suggesting is that some medications can be given in a spoonful of applesauce or pudding. This can work for liquids or medications in capsules, which can be opened and the contents poured into the food. Always check with your pharmacist first, though, as some medications are not compatible with certain foods.
  • Home Remedies for Colic
    This eMedTV page provides some possible home remedies for colic treatment, such as placing your baby in a car seat near a white noise machine or bringing your baby to a calm and quiet room. A link to more information is also included.
  • Home Remedies for Diaper Rash
    For most cases of diaper rash, home remedies are effective at eliminating the redness and irritation. This eMedTV Web page offers general suggestions on what you can do to help speed up the healing process for diaper rashes, as well as what not to do.
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