Kids Articles A-Z

Signs of Head Lice - Tessalon Capsules

This page contains links to eMedTV Kids Articles containing information on subjects from Signs of Head Lice to Tessalon Capsules. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Signs of Head Lice
    As this eMedTV page explains, signs of head lice include itching, which can cause small, red bumps, and a tickling feeling in the hair. This article lists more symptoms of an infestation, including what a head louse looks like in various stages of life.
  • Signs of Strep Throat
    Fever and a suddenly occurring sore throat are possible signs of strep throat. This eMedTV page describes other possible symptoms of this throat infection, and explains which symptoms would likely be caused by a viral infection rather than by strep.
  • Signs of Strep Throat in a Toddler
    Nasal congestion, a low-grade fever, and nasal discharge are possible signs of strep throat in a toddler. This eMedTV page outlines other possible symptoms of this throat infection, and explains why it is difficult to diagnose strep in toddlers.
  • Signs You May Notice
    Concussions are more likely to occur during sporting matches or practices, but can occur in daily play too. Signs of a concussion that you may notice in your child include appearing dazed, confused, or unsure about things; they may move clumsily and be slow to answer questions; they may even lose consciousness (and maybe only briefly). In addition, your child may not be able to remember events directly before or after the injury.
  • Signs Your Child Reports
    Pay attention to any problems your child reports after a head injury. They may complain of sensitivity to noise or light; they may report double vision or blurred vision; they may say they feel hazy, foggy, groggy, or sleepy; they may also complain about headaches or "pressure" in the head. If your child complains about anything that "just does not seem right," take the problem seriously. And remember, these signs can show up long after the actual injury has occurred.
  • Sinus Infections in Children
    A viral upper respiratory infection is one of the most common causes of sinus infections in children. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at children and sinusitis, including information on causes, symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Sklice
    Sklice is a type of medicated lotion prescribed to kill head lice. This part of the eMedTV Web site contains an overview of this medication, including details on how it works, potential side effects, and dosing tips for effectively using this medicine.
  • Sklice and Breastfeeding
    Sklice (ivermectin lotion) does pass through breast milk. However, as explained in this eMedTV article, it is unknown how much of the drug would actually reach the breast milk or whether problems would occur if a woman uses Sklice while breastfeeding.
  • Sklice and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page addresses whether it's safe for women to use Sklice (ivermectin lotion) during pregnancy. This article describes what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals and why a doctor may still prescribe it to a pregnant woman.
  • Sklice Dosage
    To treat head lice, the dosage of Sklice is the same for everyone, regardless of hair length. This eMedTV page discusses why only a single dose of this medicine is needed to kill head lice. It also offers a list of tips on using this lotion effectively.
  • Sklice Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article discusses whether Sklice interferes with any other medications. This segment takes a closer look why potential interactions with this drug are currently unknown and what you should do before using other products with Sklice.
  • Sklice Lice Medication Information
    Sklice is a medicated lotion prescribed for treating head lice in adults and children. This eMedTV resource gives more information on this medication, including how Sklice works to kill lice and eggs, dosing tips, and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Sklice Lotion
    Available by prescription only, Sklice is a lotion applied to the hair and scalp to treat head lice. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at Sklice, including information on how to use this lotion and how it works to kill head lice.
  • Sklice Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, the effects of using too much Sklice (ivermectin lotion) will depend on how much was used and whether it was taken by mouth or applied to the skin. This article describes possible overdose effects and treatment options.
  • Sklice Side Effects
    In clinical trials of Sklice, side effects included dry skin and eye irritation. This eMedTV page outlines other possible reactions to this lotion, and explains why most problems were typically uncommon. A list of serious reactions is also included.
  • Sklice Uses
    If you have head lice, a doctor may prescribe a one-time treatment of Sklice. This eMedTV Web selection explores how using Sklice can help kill lice and the eggs. It also explains whether this prescription lotion is approved for use in children.
  • Sklice Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Sklice, make sure your doctor knows if you have any allergies or if you are pregnant. This eMedTV article also explains why people should review the safety warnings and precautions associated with Sklice before using this product.
  • Skoliose
    Scoliosis is a condition in which there is a sideways curvature of the backbone. This eMedTV article describes some of the causes of scoliosis and explains whether treatment is necessary for the disorder. Skoliose is a common misspelling of scoliosis.
  • Sleeping Baby
    It is important for your baby to eventually learn how to put himself to sleep at night. This page of the eMedTV Web library takes a detailed look at babies' sleep patterns and offers suggestions on how to help your baby learn how to put himself to sleep.
  • Slept-Through-the-Night Panic
    Let's be honest here. It might not happen during the first year. Or even the second. But whenever it does happen, that first time your baby sleeps through the night, you'll probably wake up in a full panic. Do yourself a favor and take a quick, reassuring peek at your sleeping little one. You won't be able to rest until you do. Also, get used to setting your alarm clock again once your previously early riser learns to sleep in a bit.
  • Slug Bug!
    Games are a fun way to engage your children, regardless of their age. You can play a vast array of games while driving, from slug bug to the alphabet game. A fun idea is the "fortunately/unfortunately" game, which makes kids look on the bright side of things in a silly way. This includes alternating between fortunate and unfortunate events. You might say, "Unfortunately, there is a lion in the car." Your child's turn now -- maybe something like, "Fortunately, he doesn't eat kids." And so on.
  • Soothing Breast Engorgement
    Applying cold compresses when you have breast engorgement can be soothing. This eMedTV Web page explains how it is also important to breastfeed (or express breast milk) frequently and lists some of the drugs you can take for pain relief.
  • Starting Baby Juice
    You should not start giving juice to your baby until he or she is at least six months old. As this page on the eMedTV Web site explains, fruit juice provides no nutritional benefit and is not recommended or needed until after six months of age.
  • Starting Solid Foods
    In most cases, infants are ready to start solid foods between four to six months of age. This eMedTV article lists other signs that your child is ready to switch to solids and explains if it is possible to start a solid diet too early or too late.
  • Starting Solids Schedule
    There is a standard schedule recommended for babies who are first starting solids. As this eMedTV segment explains, most babies start eating cereals at four to six months old and graduate to thicker purees by eight months of age.
  • Strep Infection Throat
    This eMedTV Web article covers important information on strep, a throat infection caused by specific bacteria. This page outlines possible symptoms of this condition, describes potential treatment options, and explains when symptoms should improve.
  • Strep Thorat
    Strep throat can cause fever, white patches on the throat, and a sore throat. This eMedTV Web resource offers a brief description of this throat infection, including causes and treatment options. Strep thorat is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Strep Throat
    Strep throat is a type of bacterial infection that most often affects children between the ages of 5 and 15. This eMedTV Web article further explores this throat infection, including causes, possible symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Strep Throat (Sore Throat) Information
    This eMedTV Web article describes some of the signs of strep throat, such as fever, tender lymph glands, and a sudden sore throat. Information on strep throat treatment is also included, as well as details on what causes this throat infection.
  • Strep Throat Antibiotics
    Amoxicillin and penicillin are two antibiotics commonly used to treat strep throat. This eMedTV article further describes using antibiotics for strep throat treatment in adults and children. This page also lists some alternative treatment options.
  • Strep Throat Causes
    Strep throat is caused by specific bacteria called group A streptococcus. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at these bacteria, including the potentially serious illnesses that Streptococcus can cause, such as impetigo, scarlet fever, and pneumonia.
  • Strep Throat Complications
    As this eMedTV article describes, middle ear infections, sinusitis, and peritonsillar abscesses are some of the possible complications of strep throat. This resource also lists less common problems that may occur if this infection is left untreated.
  • Strep Throat Contact
    You can get strep throat through direct contact with infected fluids (such as nasal discharge or saliva). This eMedTV segment provides more information on how this throat infection is spread and who is at a greater risk of getting this condition.
  • Strep Throat Cure
    Antibiotics, such as penicillin, are used to cure strep throat. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers a brief overview of possible ways to treat this throat infection, and explains when a person is no longer contagious.
  • Strep Throat Definition
    Strep throat is a throat infection caused by a specific bacteria (group A streptococcus). This eMedTV article takes a brief look at the definition of strep throat, including information on possible symptoms and treatment options that are available.
  • Strep Throat Diagnosis
    A doctor may use a throat culture or a rapid strep test to diagnose strep throat. This eMedTV Web page explains how to determine if someone has this throat infection, including a list of factors that may indicate that a sore throat is a strep infection.
  • Strep Throat in Adults
    Up to 10 percent of sore throats in adults are diagnosed as strep throat. This eMedTV Web resource takes an in-depth look at how strep can affect adults, including causes, possible symptoms, and ways to prevent and treat this type of infection.
  • Strep Throat in Children
    Up to 30 percent of sore throats in children (between 5 and 15 years old) are diagnosed as strep throat. This eMedTV page further discusses how strep throat affects children, including possible symptoms and various treatment options that are available.
  • Strep Throat in Infants
    It is possible for infants to get strep throat, although it is less common. This eMedTV article provides an in-depth look at how to identify the symptoms of this infection in infants. This page also covers causes and various treatment options.
  • Strep Throat in Kids
    This eMedTV page explains that if your child is between 5 and 15 years old, he or she may have a higher risk of strep throat. Kids with this infection are generally treated with antibiotics (such as amoxicillin). This page also links to more information.
  • Strep Throat Information
    Strep throat is a type of bacterial throat infection that most commonly affects children. This eMedTV Web resource provides important information on strep throat, including what causes it, possible symptoms, and common treatment options.
  • Strep Throat Medicine
    Penicillin and amoxicillin are two of the most commonly used medicines for strep throat. This eMedTV page lists several types of antibiotics that can treat this throat infection. This page also covers which antibiotics are best for adults and children.
  • Strep Throat Prevention
    Good personal hygiene and washing your hands frequently can help prevent strep throat. This eMedTV page outlines several other tips on how to prevent the spread of this throat infection, such as staying home for 24 hours after starting antibiotics.
  • Strep Throat Risk Factors
    Age, spending time in crowded places, and certain times of the year can increase your risk of strep throat. This eMedTV segment describes some of the factors that may increase a person's chances of getting this type of throat infection.
  • Strep Throat Symptoms
    If you have strep throat, symptoms may include fever, white patches on the throat, and red tonsils. This eMedTV Web segment describes other signs of this throat infection and explains how long these symptoms typically last.
  • Strep Throat Symptoms in Children
    Because kids do not always have classic signs of strep throat, it may be difficult to diagnose. This eMedTV segment discusses possible symptoms of strep throat in children, such as decreased appetite, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge.
  • Strep Throat Transmission
    Coughing, sneezing, or touching a contaminated surface are some of the ways of spreading strep throat. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at how strep throat is transmitted and how long it takes before you begin to notice symptoms.
  • Strep Throat Treatment
    Antibiotics, such as penicillin and amoxicillin, are common treatments for strep throat. This page of the eMedTV archives describes what a healthcare provider may recommend when treating this throat infection, including possible home remedies.
  • Strep Throght
    Strep throat is caused by specific bacteria and most often affects children ages 5 to 15. This eMedTV article briefly describes this throat infection, with information on symptoms and treatment. Strep throght is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Strep Throt
    Fever, a sore throat that begins suddenly, and white patches on the tonsils are signs of strep throat. This eMedTV page further discusses this throat infection, including causes and treatment options. Strep throt is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Surgery for Scoliosis
    The goals of scoliosis surgery are to balance the spine and keep it from curving more. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this procedure, including information on its risks and benefits, as well as several questions you may want to ask your doctor.
  • Switching From Breast Milk to Formula
    Before making a complete switch from breastfeeding to formula feeding, try breaking the routine gradually. This eMedTV Web page includes more suggestions on how to make the switch easier for you and your baby.
  • Symptoms of a Sinus Infection in Children
    Cough, postnasal drip, and sore throat are just a few of the signs and symptoms of sinusitis in children. This eMedTV segment provides a list of other possible symptoms a child may have with a viral, bacterial, or chronic sinus infection.
  • Symptoms of Fever Blisters
    Up to 85 percent of people do not develop any symptoms of fever blisters during their initial infection. This eMedTV Web page lists possible signs that may occur during an outbreak, including indications of recurrent fever blisters.
  • Symptoms of Scoliosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, the signs and symptoms of scoliosis can range from shoulders that are at different heights to a waist that seems lopsided. This article offers an in-depth look at these and other possible symptoms.
  • Symptoms of Strep Throat in a Child
    A low-grade fever, fussiness, and decreased appetite are possible symptoms of strep throat in children. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of other signs of this throat infection, and explains why it can be difficult to diagnose strep in children.
  • Synagis
    Synagis is prescribed to help prevent serious problems caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This eMedTV Web selection presents information on this drug, including specific uses, how it works, what to expect during treatment, and more.
  • Synagis and Breastfeeding
    No research has been done to determine if Synagis (palivizumab) passes through breast milk. However, as this eMedTV page explains, this drug is not approved for use in adults, so it is unlikely that a doctor would prescribe Synagis to breastfeeding women.
  • Synagis and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page takes a look at whether Synagis (palivizumab) can be given to a pregnant woman. This article discusses whether any research has been done on using Synagis during pregnancy and explains why adults do not normally use this drug.
  • Synagis Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, your child's weight is the primary factor when determining an appropriate dosage of Synagis. This page contains specific dosing instructions for preventing serious RSV infections and describes how the injections are given.
  • Synagis Drug Interactions
    Belimumab and abciximab are some of the products that may interfere with Synagis. This eMedTV Web selection explores other possible drug interactions with Synagis, including details on the complications that may occur and how to avoid problems.
  • Synagis Indications
    Synagis is a prescription medicine used to prevent serious complications from RSV in infants and children. This eMedTV page explores the uses (or "indications") for Synagis, including why it is not approved for use in adults and details on how it works.
  • Synagis Infants Prophylaxis
    As a type of prophylaxis, Synagis can help prevent infants from developing serious problems due to RSV. This eMedTV Web page explores how this drug can help prevent RSV infections from becoming worse in children. A link to more details is also included.
  • Synagis Injection
    Available in the form of an injection, Synagis is given to children to help prevent serious RSV infections. This eMedTV resource contains some dosing instructions for how these injections are given and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Synagis Medication Information
    Synagis is prescribed for preventing serious problems in infants and children exposed to RSV infections. This eMedTV Web selection provides more information on Synagis, including how this drug works, potential side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Synagis Overdose
    This eMedTV segment explains that if your child receives too much Synagis (palivizumab), it might cause vomiting and diarrhea. However, as this article discusses, an overdose is unlikely to occur, as this drug is given by a healthcare provider.
  • Synagis Recommendations
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor's recommendations for Synagis use can help prevent an RSV infection from becoming severe enough to cause potentially dangerous problems in an infant or child. This page explores this topic and links to more details.
  • Synagis RSV Prophylaxis
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Synagis can be an effective prophylaxis for preventing RSV infections from becoming severe enough to cause serious problems in infants and children. This page examines the benefits of this drug and links to more details.
  • Synagis Shots
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, a doctor may prescribe monthly shots of Synagis to help prevent severe complications in children who are at a high risk for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This page further examines some dosing instructions.
  • Synagis Side Effects
    Commonly reported side effects of Synagis include ear infections, common cold symptoms, and fever. This eMedTV article lists other possible reactions to this drug, including some of the serious complications that may require medical treatment.
  • Synagis Uses
    Synagis is approved to reduce the risk for serious problems in children exposed to RSV infections. This eMedTV page examines what Synagis is used for and how it works to prevent serious problems in children who are at high risk for RSV complications.
  • Synagis Vaccine
    Although it is not a type of vaccine, Synagis can help prevent RSV complications in some children. This eMedTV segment explains the beneficial effects of giving this drug to children who have a high risk for certain problems that can occur with RSV.
  • Synagis Warnings and Precautions
    Synagis can cause severe allergic reactions in some children. This selection from the eMedTV Web library features other important warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting treatment with Synagis, including when children should not use it.
  • Synagus
    As this eMedTV page explains, infants and children who have a high risk for developing serious RSV infections may benefit from Synagis. This page covers how this drug works, dosing tips, and side effects. Synagus is a common misspelling of Synagis.
  • Synegist
    Synagis helps prevent serious complications in infants and children who have a high risk for RSV infections. This eMedTV page takes a look at this prescription drug, including when it is used and dosing tips. Synegist is a common misspelling of Synagis.
  • Synogist
    Synagis is a drug licensed to prevent serious problems from occurring in certain children exposed to RSV. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of how this drug works and provides a link to more details. Synogist is a common misspelling of Synagis.
  • Taking Care of Yourself While Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article explains, taking care of yourself is crucial once the baby comes, especially if you're dealing with the physical demands of breastfeeding. This segment shares some helpful tips for balancing breastfeeding and self-care.
  • Teathing
    When a baby is teething (growing the first teeth), he or she may experience significant pain and discomfort. This eMedTV page lists potential signs of teething and explores possible treatment options. Teathing is a common misspelling of teething.
  • Teething
    Teething is part of the growing process in which your baby's first teeth come in (and may cause pain). This eMedTV article describes this process in more detail, lists pain relief remedies, and explains when babies typically go through this stage.
  • Teething and Fussiness
    In a number of babies who are teething, fussiness is a common symptom. This portion of the eMedTV library lists some of the other likely signs of teething and includes suggestions for relieving teething pain and discomfort.
  • Teething Remedies
    One way to relieve teething pain in a baby is to give children's acetaminophen (never give aspirin). This eMedTV resource explains what other over-the-counter pain medications are available and lists available natural remedies for teething pain.
  • Teething Schedule
    The average baby begins teething between 6 and 10 months of age. As this eMedTV Web page explains, most babies follow the same schedule for teething; the front bottom teeth come in first, and all their teeth usually come in by 30 months of age.
  • Teething Symptoms and Signs
    Gum rubbing, low-grade fever, and irritability or crankiness are common teething signs and symptoms. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible signs and briefly explains when these symptoms appear and how long they typically last.
  • Temperament
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are three main types of temperament in children, which may be identifiable even in a newborn. This page explores these types, including a list of traits that may help you determine which kind your child has.
  • Temperament and Colic
    Distractibility and adaptability are two personality traits that may contribute to a baby developing colic. This eMedTV resource further discusses the relationship between temperament and colic, explaining why some traits may play a role.
  • Temperment
    There are three main types of temperament in children (easy, difficult, and slow-to-warm-up). This eMedTV page explores these types and covers why it is important to determine your child's temperament. Temperment is a common misspelling of temperament.
  • Tesalon Pearls
    Tessalon Perles are a type of medication taken to treat a cough. This eMedTV Web page briefly describes these spherical-shaped liquid capsules and links to more information on the topic. Tesalon Pearls is a common misspelling of Tessalon Perles.
  • Tessalon
    Tessalon is a cough-suppressing medication that is available only by prescription. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this product, with information on strengths, possible side effects, drug warnings, and dosing guidelines.
  • Tessalon Capsules
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Tessalon comes in two strengths and is available in capsule form. This resource takes a closer look at Tessalon capsules, with information on how they work and what to discuss with your doctor before taking them.
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