Baby Advice

When you are a parent, it is inevitable that people will want to give you advice. For first-time parents who have many questions, there are several places you can go to get sound advice, such as parenting classes, your healthcare provider, your parents, and your friends. Just remember that if someone is offering you advice on your baby, it is probably not likely that they are trying to be judgmental or critical; most people who offer advice have your best interests at heart.

Baby Advice -- The Good, the Bad, and the Unsolicited

Everyone wants to give baby advice. Some of it's good; some of it is not so good. And then there is the advice that is just plain unwanted, seeming to come just at the wrong time.
 
There is no doubt that new parents have many questions and have not necessarily learned the "tricks of the trade." But it seems like no other situation attracts the same amount of advice as parenthood. It is as if having a pregnant belly or a baby on your hip is actually a request for advice and opinions.
 

Helpful Places for Advice on Babies

Many first-time parents feel overwhelmed with parenthood. There are so many changes that are occurring and it's not like most people remember the great parenting lessons learned in high school while carrying that egg around.
 
So where are some good places that you can go for advice? Below are some of the places to go for sound baby advice:
 
  • Parenting classes: Many hospitals have parenting "classes" that you can attend. Start with the hospital where you delivered your baby.
     
  • The local community college: Many community colleges have playgroups, which meet once a week with a parent educator available to discuss hot topics. You can also interact with other parents going through the same things as you.
     
  • Your child's healthcare providers: This should be the first place you go to learn about health and wellness-related issues for your baby.
     
  • Your parents: As difficult as it may be to believe, they were once in your situation.
     
  • Your friends: Has anyone already had kids?
     
  • Web sites: There are a number of great Web sites that provide useful information for new parents. There are also many Web sites with information that is just flat-out wrong. Look for sites having an editorial process in place and that use professionals in that particular field. Also, check a couple of sites to compare information. Finally, remember that just because it is on the Internet, it does not make it right. Just like in the real world, many people love to give advice; but a lot of it is just plain bad.
     
Written by/reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
Last reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
Last updated/reviewed:
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