How Is Mono Spread?

Mono (mononucleosis) is usually transmitted though mucus and saliva, which is where the nickname "kissing disease" comes from. The viruses that cause mono can be spread in several other ways, such as sipping from the same straw or glass as an infected person, or even just being close when the person coughs or sneezes.

How Is Mono Spread?

Mono (mononucleosis) is usually spread though saliva and mucus, which is where the "kissing disease" nickname comes from. But the kissing or close contact that can spread mono doesn't occur right before you get sick. The virus that causes mono has a long incubation period: 30 to 50 days from the time you're exposed to it to the time you get sick.
 
In addition, the viruses that cause mono (see Mononucleosis Causes) can be spread in other ways, such as sipping from the same straw or glass as an infected person, or even just being close when the person coughs or sneezes. Also, some people can have the virus in their systems without ever having mono symptoms, and you can still catch it from them.
 
For this reason, transmission of mono is almost impossible to prevent; therefore, no special precautions are necessary for someone who has mono in order to prevent the spread of the illness.
 
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Information on Mono

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